On this episode of the GG Podcast, Dr. Reed Davis joins the show.  On the show, Reed shares his backstory on why treating the root problem of health problems is the best way to increase longevity and quality of life. He also discusses the deeper problems of Lyme Disease.

Reed is the Founder of the Functional Diagnostic Nutrition® (FDN) Certification Course.  He is known as one of the most successful and experienced clinicians in the world, having provided functional lab assessments to over 10,000 clients for hormone, adrenal, digestive, immune and detoxification issues as well as infections, infestations, food sensitivities and chronic stress-related problems.

Reed served as a Health Director and Case Manager for over 15 years and now teaches a course in functional medicine with over 2,000 trainees in 50 countries. He is also a Clinical Advisor at BioHealth Laboratory where he helps doctors interpret lab test results and develop natural protocols to restore function instead of just treating the symptoms.

While serving for many years as the CNT and Case Manager, Reed Davis made his own observations about who got better and who did not. The patients who improved the most were the ones working as close to the underlying cause as possible, and not simply treating the symptoms. Wanting to help as many people as possible, Reed employed functional lab testing as it applies to nutrition and other natural protocols with thousands of patients.

Educating others became a passion and provided a mission that Reed carries out to this day. While systematizing the work, Reed came to the realization that he had discovered an emerging field. He named this growing body of work Functional Diagnostic Nutrition® and founded the certification course.

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Show Notes:

 FDN – Functional Diagnostic Nutrition 

@ReedDavisFDN

Reed’s YouTube Channel

 

  • SpaceFromGreece!

    it would be great to have a written transcript for all of us that steal some time to chack your website at the office !)
    Thanks for your hard work !

  • Lucas

    Phylum
    Bacteroidetes 75.48%
    Firmicutes 19.1%
    Proteobacteria 5.05%
    Actinobacteria 0.37%

    Class

    Bacteroidia 75.48%
    Clostridia 17.28%
    Betaproteobacteria 2.66%
    Gammaproteobacteria 2.33%
    Negativicutes 1.29%
    Erysipelotrichia 0.47%
    Actinobacteria 0.37%
    Bacilli 0.06%
    Deltaproteobacteria 0.05%

    Order
    Bacteroidales 75.46%
    Clostridiales 17.28%
    Burkholderiales 2.66%
    Selenomonadales 1.29%
    Pasteurellales 1.19%
    Enterobacteriales 1.14%
    Erysipelotrichales 0.47%
    Actinomycetales 0.37%
    Lactobacillales0.06%
    Desulfovibrionales 0.05%

    Family

    Bacteroidaceae71.0%
    Lachnospiraceae 15.71%
    Sutterellaceae 2.66%
    Porphyromonadaceae 2.42%
    Rikenellaceae 1.98%
    Pasteurellaceae 1.19%
    Enterobacteriaceae 1.14%
    Clostridiaceae 1.02%
    Acidaminococcaceae 1.02%
    Erysipelotrichaceae 0.47%
    Corynebacteriaceae 0.37%
    Veillonellaceae 0.28%
    Ruminococcaceae 0.25%
    Peptostreptococcaceae 0.14%
    Clostridiales Family XI. Incertae Sedis0.06%
    Desulfovibrionaceae 0.05%
    Prevotellaceae 0.05%
    Aerococcaceae 0.02%
    Streptococcaceae 0.02%

    Genus
    Bacteroides 71.0%
    Roseburia 7.79%
    Blautia 2.84%
    Parasutterella 2.66%
    Parabacteroides 2.25%
    Pseudobutyrivibrio 1.6%
    Alistipes 1.55%
    Anaerostipes 1.4%
    Kluyvera 1.08%
    Haemophilus 1.04%
    Phascolarctobacterium 1.02%
    Clostridium 0.7%
    Lachnospira 0.67%
    Dorea 0.57%
    Corynebacterium 0.37%
    Turicibacter 0.36%
    Veillonella 0.28%
    Sarcina 0.23%
    Odoribacter 0.18%
    Pasteurella 0.16%
    Intestinibacter 0.14%
    Flavonifractor 0.1%
    Anaerotruncus 0.1%
    Faecalibacterium 0.07%
    Enterobacter 0.06%
    Prevotella 0.05%
    Bilophila 0.05%
    Holdemania 0.05%
    Marvinbryantia 0.04%
    Oscillospira 0.04%
    Hydrogenoanaerobacterium 0.03%
    Erysipelatoclostridium 0.03%
    Anaerococcus 0.02%
    Finegoldia 0.02%
    Dielma 0.02%
    Facklamia 0.02%
    Peptoniphilus 0.02%
    Streptococcus0.02%

  • Lucas

    Phylum
    Bacteroidetes 75.48%
    Firmicutes 19.1%
    Proteobacteria 5.05%
    Actinobacteria 0.37%

    Class

    Bacteroidia 75.48%
    Clostridia 17.28%
    Betaproteobacteria 2.66%
    Gammaproteobacteria 2.33%
    Negativicutes 1.29%
    Erysipelotrichia 0.47%
    Actinobacteria 0.37%
    Bacilli 0.06%
    Deltaproteobacteria 0.05%

    Order
    Bacteroidales 75.46%
    Clostridiales 17.28%
    Burkholderiales 2.66%
    Selenomonadales 1.29%
    Pasteurellales 1.19%
    Enterobacteriales 1.14%
    Erysipelotrichales 0.47%
    Actinomycetales 0.37%
    Lactobacillales0.06%
    Desulfovibrionales 0.05%

    Family

    Bacteroidaceae71.0%
    Lachnospiraceae 15.71%
    Sutterellaceae 2.66%
    Porphyromonadaceae 2.42%
    Rikenellaceae 1.98%
    Pasteurellaceae 1.19%
    Enterobacteriaceae 1.14%
    Clostridiaceae 1.02%
    Acidaminococcaceae 1.02%
    Erysipelotrichaceae 0.47%
    Corynebacteriaceae 0.37%
    Veillonellaceae 0.28%
    Ruminococcaceae 0.25%
    Peptostreptococcaceae 0.14%
    Clostridiales Family XI. Incertae Sedis0.06%
    Desulfovibrionaceae 0.05%
    Prevotellaceae 0.05%
    Aerococcaceae 0.02%
    Streptococcaceae 0.02%

    Genus
    Bacteroides 71.0%
    Roseburia 7.79%
    Blautia 2.84%
    Parasutterella 2.66%
    Parabacteroides 2.25%
    Pseudobutyrivibrio 1.6%
    Alistipes 1.55%
    Anaerostipes 1.4%
    Kluyvera 1.08%
    Haemophilus 1.04%
    Phascolarctobacterium 1.02%
    Clostridium 0.7%
    Lachnospira 0.67%
    Dorea 0.57%
    Corynebacterium 0.37%
    Turicibacter 0.36%
    Veillonella 0.28%
    Sarcina 0.23%
    Odoribacter 0.18%
    Pasteurella 0.16%
    Intestinibacter 0.14%
    Flavonifractor 0.1%
    Anaerotruncus 0.1%
    Faecalibacterium 0.07%
    Enterobacter 0.06%
    Prevotella 0.05%
    Bilophila 0.05%
    Holdemania 0.05%
    Marvinbryantia 0.04%
    Oscillospira 0.04%
    Hydrogenoanaerobacterium 0.03%
    Erysipelatoclostridium 0.03%
    Anaerococcus 0.02%
    Finegoldia 0.02%
    Dielma 0.02%
    Facklamia 0.02%
    Peptoniphilus 0.02%
    Streptococcus0.02%

  • Mike Robins

    anyone else suffer from severe bloating after taking even a tiny bit of fiber?

    • Samantha Rodes

      Sounds like your ratio of good to ‘not so friendly’ bacteria is off. Could be sibo. Could also be yeasts. What kind of fiber are you referring to? IE, supplement (inulin/fos, etc), diet (fruit, veg, nut/seed), FODMAP? Talk to your dr. OR, consult w/ Grace.

      • Mike Robins

        tested 3x for SIBO all negative. also reversed my leaky gut. but the bloat lingers 🙂 pretty much all fiber bloats me. now using larch arabinogalactan but in the past used acacia and inulin. getting ubiome test done so will see whats growing in there. Currently on low histamine low grain diet and no gluten or dairy or eggs – also have some autoimmune problems

        • Samantha Rodes

          Autoimmune? Again it could not be directly induced by the gut but more of a casualty that the gut is suffering from due to your Auto immune disease

          • Mike Robins

            no my gut problems came first- thats what caused the autoimmunity

          • Samantha Rodes

            Sorry to hear about your troubles. It would definitely help to speak with Grace or a functional practitioner.

          • Mike Robins

            thx would love to get in touch with Grace but i have no idea how to. i emailed her several times on her site and never got a response. its easier to get in touch with Obama 🙂 lol

          • Samantha Rodes

            God, I know. Try her Twitter handle- I got not 1 but 2 replies within a day (I’m researching for a book, and asked about a probiotic I came across for athletes).